Results for Tag: Saudi Arabia

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Qatar’s Media Landscape: An Overview

Qatar’s 21st-century media environment has been largely dominated by the growth of al-Jazeera, which consolidated itself as a major international media outlet after securing unrivalled access to war zones in Afghanistan and Iraq. The channel established an English-language service in 2006 as it continued to expand, however its popularity has since begun to wane amid accusations of biased reporting during the 2011 Arab uprisings, and due to the competitive pressure exerted by Saudi Arabia and its own pan-Arab news channel, al-Arabiya.

The League of Arab States

Based on the Alexandria Protocol of 1944, the League of Arab States – commonly referred to as the Arab League – was founded in Cairo on 22 March 1945. In its charter, the founding members of the Arab League (Egypt, Syria, Transjordan, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Lebanon, and Yemen) stated that the purpose of the League is ‘to draw closer the relations between member States and co-ordinate their political activities.

The League of Arab States

Based on the Alexandria Protocol of 1944, the League of Arab States – commonly referred to as the Arab League – was founded in Cairo on 22 March 1945. In its charter, the founding members of the Arab League (Egypt, Syria, Transjordan, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Lebanon, and Yemen) stated that the purpose of the League is ‘to draw closer the relations between member States and co-ordinate their political activities with the aim of realizing a close collaboration between them, to safeguard their independence and sovereignty, and to consider in a general way the affairs and interests of the Arab countries’, seeking collaboration on matters of economics, communication, culture, nationality, social welfare, and health.

Democratic changes

The Jasmine Revolution began on 17 December 2010, when Mohamed Bouazizi set himself on fire in Sidi Bouzid, and ended on 14 January 2011, the day President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali (b. 1936) fled to Saudi Arabia. On that day, the people suddenly found their voice and a public space to express it. TV and radio stations heard everyone’s grievances, and public places were transformed into large-scale Hyde Park Speakers’ Corners. Executive power was transferred from the president to the prime minister, and civil society became very active and influential, while the army became more visible and the police less arrogant.