Results for Tag: relations

312 results found.
Perception of US policy in the Middle East

The Obama administration’s effort to encourage its Arab allies to carry a bigger burden in promoting peace in the Middle East has not revitalized its alliances with a new sense of common purpose and cooperation. Rather, it has left traditional partners feeling abandoned.

The Next Iranian Elections mark a new period in the Republic’s Internal Power Struggle

The intensity of inter-factional power struggle illustrated by the constant leakages of corruption against rival camps together with the increasing frustration of people with religious government could finally expose the Islamic Republic to the consequences of its own internal contradictions.

Yemeni President Hadi, a Reluctant Leader Who Became a Stubborn One

Ever since Hadi took over the presidency, things went wrong. Despite some reshuffles in the leadership of the armed forces, he did not manage to get rid of the remains of the Saleh-clan. Instead, he started appointing his own family members and cronies to strategic positions. It made the Yemeni’s doubt his sincerity and leadership skills.

Bahrain’s Media Landscape: An Overview

Bahrain’s power structure and demographics mean that the government has traditionally placed particular emphasis on the media as a propaganda tool, and has sought to minimize dissident Shiite voices as much as possible through its close control of the sector.

After a 29-month Political Vacuum, Lebanon Elects a New President

On 31 October 2016, Lebanon’s parliament has elected a former army general as president, following a surprising shift in allegiances across the country’s divided political parties. The vote breaks the political deadlock that has left many state institutions barely functioning and prevented legislation from being passed for more than two years.

Israel Outraged by Latest UNESCO Resolution on Jerusalem

On 26 October 2016, the UNESCO adopted a contentious resolution on the conservation of Jerusalem’s religious heritage which denies Judaism’s deep ties to one of the city’s holiest sites. However, It seems abundantly clear that the Israeli government, together with the right-wing Israeli NGO Elad, is doing everything in its power to ‘Judaize’ the – occupied – surroundings of the disputed holy sites. And this is one thing the Israeli lamentations about the ‘missing link’ have achieved: no one is talking about these underlying issues.

The Rise and Fall of Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood

The Muslim Brotherhood, one of the largest Islamic movements in the world, has had its share of ups and down since its humble beginnings in the 1920s. After rising to the highest level of Egyptian politics, finally obtaining the presidency in 2012, a popularly backed coup in 2013 left the movement in tatters and most of its leaders either imprisoned or in hiding.

Muhammad ibn al-Dheeb al-Ajami, Qatar’s Persecuted Poet

The Qatari poet Muhammad ibn al-Dheeb al-Ajami, a third-year literature student at Cairo University, was arrested on 16 November 2011 in Doha on charges of insulting the Qatari Emir, Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad al-Thani, and for inciting to overthrow the ruling regime. The latter carries a maximum sentence of death. Al-Ajami was originally jailed for life, but the sentence was reduced to 15 years on appeal. However, he was released after receiving a royal pardon from the Emir himself on 15 March 2016.

After Failed Coup, Turkey’s Economy Struggles to Rebound

Since 2013, the Turkish miracle has been fading. The massive ‘Gezi Park’ protests in the summer of that year resulted in an authoritarian drift that also hurt the country’s economy. Turkey’s slowdown is partly attributable to international factors like weak growth in the eurozone, the readjustment of US monetary policy, the Russian recession and the wars in Iraq and Syria. Now, interest rates are spiking, the economy is slowing and dollar-denominated loans are becoming impossible to service. Moreover, housing prices keep rising despite an excess real estate stock, which looks like a bubble. That’s the real risk: if there’s a bubble, and it bursts, that could unleash a chain reaction, political and economic

Yemen: Back into the Arms of President Saleh

In less than six years, the country has been thrown back decennia, with possibly another Saleh era to come, along with a new Cold War, both things with which Yemen is historically familiar. It is hardly a result the West, or the GCC, can be hoping for, but it is what this war has led to.