Results for Tag: Regime

371 results found.
Libya’s Media Landscape: An Overview

After the 2011 revolution and the ouster of the Gaddafi regime, the transitional government opted to abolish the main newspapers of the Gaddafi era and establish new ones. Private print publications, websites, television and radio stations began to emerge rapidly in this new era of media openness. However, the country’s subsequent civil war and ongoing conflicts have led to a chaotic media environment.

Perception of US policy in the Middle East

The Obama administration’s effort to encourage its Arab allies to carry a bigger burden in promoting peace in the Middle East has not revitalized its alliances with a new sense of common purpose and cooperation. Rather, it has left traditional partners feeling abandoned.

Tunisia’s Media Landscape: An Overview

Tunisia’s post-2011 newspaper industry has sought to better reflect public sentiments and a variety of new publications has emerged. Yet the country’s transition toward an open press has slowed in recent years.

Five Years After Promised Reform, Human Rights in Algeria Still Severely Restricted

Human rights violations fall into five main areas: freedom of association, peaceful assembly and protest, freedom of speech, women’s rights, minority rights and accountability for past crimes. In sum, human rights in Algeria are frequently violated and the government seems deaf to the repeated calls to remedy the situation.

In Egypt, Political Satire Pushed to the Margins

Amid the ongoing crackdown on any voices of dissent, political satire is seen as a threat to the authority and legitimacy of the regime, which continues to maintain that it is in a transitional phase towards democracy.

The Rise and Fall of Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood

The Muslim Brotherhood, one of the largest Islamic movements in the world, has had its share of ups and down since its humble beginnings in the 1920s. After rising to the highest level of Egyptian politics, finally obtaining the presidency in 2012, a popularly backed coup in 2013 left the movement in tatters and most of its leaders either imprisoned or in hiding.

Muhammad ibn al-Dheeb al-Ajami, Qatar’s Persecuted Poet

The Qatari poet Muhammad ibn al-Dheeb al-Ajami, a third-year literature student at Cairo University, was arrested on 16 November 2011 in Doha on charges of insulting the Qatari Emir, Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad al-Thani, and for inciting to overthrow the ruling regime. The latter carries a maximum sentence of death. Al-Ajami was originally jailed for life, but the sentence was reduced to 15 years on appeal. However, he was released after receiving a royal pardon from the Emir himself on 15 March 2016.

After Failed Coup, Turkey’s Economy Struggles to Rebound

Since 2013, the Turkish miracle has been fading. The massive ‘Gezi Park’ protests in the summer of that year resulted in an authoritarian drift that also hurt the country’s economy. Turkey’s slowdown is partly attributable to international factors like weak growth in the eurozone, the readjustment of US monetary policy, the Russian recession and the wars in Iraq and Syria. Now, interest rates are spiking, the economy is slowing and dollar-denominated loans are becoming impossible to service. Moreover, housing prices keep rising despite an excess real estate stock, which looks like a bubble. That’s the real risk: if there’s a bubble, and it bursts, that could unleash a chain reaction, political and economic

Wael Ghonim: Symbol of Egypt’s Revolution and Emblematic of its Failure

At the start of the protests, Ghonim was detained for 11 days. After his release, he appeared on television and addressed the protesting crowd on Tahrir Square, quickly making him a symbol of the revolution.

Human Rights Situation in Syria

The 2016 Human Rights Watch (HRW) country report for Syria documents the escalating use of violence in the war-torn country. Five years after the start of a conflict that involves numerous state and non-state actors, violations of human rights and international war treaties and protocols have become a daily occurrence. However, Syria’s appalling human rights record goes back decades.