Results for Tag: Kuwait

55 results found.
Kuwait’s Media Landscape: An Overview

Kuwait has a relatively open media environment in comparison to its Gulf neighbours, and is ranked highest of all the Gulf states in the Reporters Without Borders 2016 World Press Freedom Index. However, its ranking of 103 (out of 179) indicates that Kuwaiti journalists face restrictions on their reporting and that negative portrayals of certain subjects, such as Islam or the ruling family, remain off-limits.

Informal Marriages Surge in Algeria

A decade later, in 2015, Algeria is witnessing a surge in nikah al-misyar, or traveller’s marriage. Imported from Middle Eastern countries like Saudi Arabia and Egypt via the Gulf states, it is now finding its way into educated Algerian society, particularly academia. An al-misyar marriage is a religiously permitted form of marriage contract to which a man and a woman agree in the presence of two witnesses.

Kuwaiti Oil Sparks Tensions with Neighbours

Surrounded by regional powerhouses like Saudi Arabia, Iraq and Iran, there could always be someone after your oil. That is the sentiment of many Kuwaitis, with some of them even using the word ‘monsters’ rather than ‘powerhouses’. Kuwait has good reason to be wary of its neighbours, although news reports about oil-greedy neighbours should be viewed with caution. This is not only because one neighbour may try to slander the other, but also because Kuwait may have an interest in scaring its own people.

Gulf-Arabs Differ on Iran Nuclear Deal

Although all the Gulf countries officially welcomed the deal, the positions of their governments varied significantly. Official statements showed that Saudi Arabia and Bahrain are the most worried about the consequences of the nuclear deal. Qatar also has concerns but to a lesser degree. The United Arab Emirates and Oman were the two Gulf countries most welcoming of the deal, followed by Kuwait.

Gulf-Arabs Differ on Iran Nuclear Deal

Although all the Gulf countries officially welcomed the deal, the positions of their governments varied significantly. Official statements showed that Saudi Arabia and Bahrain are the most worried about the consequences of the nuclear deal. Qatar also has concerns but to a lesser degree. The United Arab Emirates and Oman were the two Gulf countries most welcoming of the deal, followed by Kuwait.