Results for Tag: Bahrain

49 results found.
Bahrain Carries Out First Executions Since 2010

At 3am on 15 January 2017, Bahrain executed by firing squad Ali al-Singace, 21, Abbas al-Samea, 27, and Sami Mushaima, 42, for killing three police officers in a 2014 bomb attack. The executions sparked local outrage. Dozens of protestors clashed with police, blocking roads with burning tires, hurling firebombs and gasoline bombs. Security forces dispersed the protestors with tear gas and wounded several by firing buckshot.

Kuwait’s Media Landscape: An Overview

Kuwait has a relatively open media environment in comparison to its Gulf neighbours, and is ranked highest of all the Gulf states in the Reporters Without Borders 2016 World Press Freedom Index. However, its ranking of 103 (out of 179) indicates that Kuwaiti journalists face restrictions on their reporting and that negative portrayals of certain subjects, such as Islam or the ruling family, remain off-limits.

This Summer, No Respite for Bahrain’s Heated Politics

A court in Bahrain dissolved the main Shia opposition party al-Wefaq in July 2016. The problem is a straightforward one: the opposition wants more democracy and all that comes with it, such as a constitutional monarchy, transparency, inclusiveness, equality and justice. The government, which is essentially an extension of the royal family, does not.

Sheikh Ali Salman, a Popular Bahraini Dissident

Ali Salman the popular dissident, Shiite cleric, and secretary general of Al Wefaq National Islamic Society, the main opposition group in Bahrain, was arrested after a series of speeches he delivered calling for political reform and accountability. It was by no means the first time Sheikh Salman had been imprisoned. After a long career in demanding political reform and human rights for the Bahraini people, Salman was jailed between 1993 and 1994, and was banished from the country in 1995.

Nabeel Rajab: The Government’s Troublemaker

In addition to Rajab’s prominent activities in protests and demonstrations, he is well known for his pioneering use of social networking, which he has used as a key element in his human-rights campaigning to spread the word to the international community of the abuses his nation is suffering. This virtual battlefield got him into prison more than once. Although it seemed that the government was trying hard to get Rajab removed from the scene every time it had the chance, that only made Rajab and his case more famous.

Informal Marriages Surge in Algeria

A decade later, in 2015, Algeria is witnessing a surge in nikah al-misyar, or traveller’s marriage. Imported from Middle Eastern countries like Saudi Arabia and Egypt via the Gulf states, it is now finding its way into educated Algerian society, particularly academia. An al-misyar marriage is a religiously permitted form of marriage contract to which a man and a woman agree in the presence of two witnesses.