Results for Category: Society, Media & Culture

388 results found.
Iran’s Media Landscape: An Overview

The early 21st century media environment fluctuated between periods of relative openness and restriction. However, any initial optimism was ultimately quashed following the events of the 2009 Iranian presidential election protests, which prompted a government crackdown on dissenting media voices. Foreign journalists were temporarily expelled and a mass arrest campaign was undertaken to target domestic reporters. The government of Mahmoud Ahmadinejad also sought to dramatically cut subsidies underpinning the country’s more liberal newspapers.

Palestine’s Media Landscape: An Overview

The Palestinian media environment is not conducive to freedom of expression. It is dominated by partisan reporting and undue influence from the Palestinian Authority (PA) and Hamas, in addition to external interference from Israel. Both in the West Bank and Gaza, ruling authorities maintain close control over the content that is produced. The Israeli military is also able to regulate Palestine’s media output by enacting anti-incitement procedures against outspoken journalists.

UNRWA Curriculum Accused of Inciting Violence Against Israel

According to the pro-Israeli propaganda organization, Institute for Monitoring Peace and Cultural Tolerance in School Education, Palestinian textbooks are a key source of incitement that drives terror attacks. The neutrality of the textbooks is a sensitive topic for UNRWA. As a neutral party, UNRWA finds itself between a rock and a hard place, trying to balance both interests, while at the same time hoping to avoid accusations of partiality.

Iraq’s Media Landscape: An Overview

After the end of Saddam Hussein’s reign in 2003, and the fall of the Baath party, the Iraqi media environment was rapidly opened up under American occupation. By 2004, over 200 newspapers had begun publishing, in addition to around 80 radio stations and 20 television channels. The Iraqi public were also quick to purchase satellite dishes and receive transmissions from abroad. A revised constitution created in 2005 enshrined media freedom, further adding to initial optimism about a new era for the Iraqi media. However, repressive government measures, exacerbated by sectarian tensions, violence and the seizure of territory by Islamic State (ISIS), have made the country one of the most hostile environments for journalists to operate in.