Results for Category: Lebanon

74 results found.
In Lebanon, Security Takes Precedence Over Human Rights

A United Nations report stated that ‘torture in Lebanon is a pervasive practice that is routinely used by the armed forces and law enforcement agencies’. In October 2016, the parliament even adopted a new law establishing a National Human Rights Institute that will include a committee to investigate the use of torture. However, the recent deaths of the four Syrian detainees in army custody have raised fresh concerns about the army’s tactics and public criticism of it.

Could Solar Power Solve Lebanon’s Electricity Crisis?

According to the UNDP’s 2016 Solar PV Status Report for Lebanon, ‘solar PV electricity capacity in 2015 was 0.47 per cent of EDL’s [Electricité du Liban, state-owned company in charge of national electricity distribution] total electricity capacity and 0.11 per cent of EDL’s total annual electricity generation’. The report also stated that ‘from 2010 until the end of 2015, cumulative installed solar PV electricity capacity has grown by an average rate of 101 per cent per year’, and that ‘the number of new solar PV projects increased from 18 in 2011 to 94 in 2013 and to 259 in 2015’.

Hezbollah: From Militia to Political Force

In 1985, Hezbollah officially announced its establishment by publishing a manifesto that listed among its objectives the need to expel ‘the Americans, the French and their allies definitely from Lebanon, putting an end to any colonialist entity on our land’. It also called for the ‘obliteration’ of Israel and the ‘adoption of the Islamic system on the basis of free and direct selection of the people, not on the basis of forceful imposition’, and labelled the US and the Soviet Union as Islam’s principal enemies.

Palestinian camps in Lebanon

Lebanon has been one of the destinations of Palestinian refugees since 1948 and it hosts today 12 sites and 449,957 registered refugees. According to UNRWA reports, half of the Palestinian refugee population in Lebanon is 25 years of age and younger, rendering the population majorly youthful. Additionally, around 62% of the refugee population are inhabitants of camps, while the remaining 38% are either dispersed around the country or reside in gatherings in the vicinity of these camps, yet they are not part of the official settlements and do not receive the same services registered refugees do.